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Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)
will look at its importance in the region and its relationship with the united states. "this is america" visits the republic of kazakhstan. "this is america" is made possible by -- the national education association, the nation's largest advocate for children and public education. poongsan corporation, forging a higher global standard. the ctc foundation, afo communications, and the rotondaro family trust. this year, kazakhstan celebrates its 20th anniversary of independence. on this program, we will learn about what it was like before independence 20 years ago, and how oil and a visionary president made kazakhstan the success it is today and why diversifying its economy will be the key to kazakhstan's even brighter future. >> it was a while the economy, while business economy, and a great economy mainly. today, we have a lot of public companies. our businessmen are doing international joint ventures. if you take the society as a whole, are people became much more open-minded, a free, outspoken people, and we are much different from what we were before. >> has that been exciting to be a
-thirds of the g.d.p. of the united states of america. over $9 trillion. they write half of the mortgages in this country, and two-thirds of the credit cards, okay? three out of the four large financial institutions that we bailed out because they were too big to fail are today bigger than they were before we bailed them out. now, if this were teddy roosevelt were president of the united states, what do you think he would say? he'd say, "break these babies up." let's create a system where the financial institutions actually invest and lend money into the productive economy, where businesses are trying to produce products or create services, not the kind of casino, this horrendous, ugly casino that we have on wall street. >> but senator durbin, the number two democrat in the senate said to me and to others that the banks, wall street, those six firms now own the senate. >> that's right. that's all absolutely right. >> how are you going to, how are you going to get a reform there, when they -- >> well, that takes us back to another issue that dick and i and others are working on. and that i
the moment in president obama's state of the union message when he said, "citizens united is going to invite contributions from foreign companies." >>> last week the supreme court reversed a century of law that i believe will open the flood gates for special interests including foreign corporations. >>> and justice alito out there, "no, it's not true." is it true? >> the reason there was a bone of contention there is that in citizens united itself, stevens, justice stevens and his dissent had said, "this is going to allow foreign money in." the majority in their opinion responded to stevens and said, "there's nothing in this case that has anything to do with foreign money. we're talking about corporate money only. there's a whole separate ban on foreign money in u.s. elections, and that is not being challenged today. so that law remains in place." the issue behind it all is how do we know? if you have all these anonymous sources of spending, we have no way of knowing where the money is coming from. >> take aramco, for example. we talked about the american petroleum institute earlier. one of
. and as a state senator, he worked to pass campaign finance reform. as a united states senator, he was critical and to the passing of ethics and lobbying reform after the jack abramoff scandal. he refused to take contributions from registered lobbyists or political action committees. and as a presidential candidate, he promised to, quote, "tell the corporate lobbyists that their days of setting the agenda in washington are over." >>> i am in this race to tell the corporate lobbyists that their days of setting the agenda in washington are over. i have done more than any other candidate in this race to take on lobbyists, and won. they have not funded my campaign, they will not work in my white house, and they will not drown out the voices of the american people when i am president. >> and his own convention, was crawling with lobbyists schmoozing with politicians. and now, rahm emanuel has been turned loose by the president to go for the gold. did you suggest earlier that he didn't have a choice? that with the great accumulation of money by the republicans, he had to match them in order to be a v
of the united states has officially declared himself an enemy of traditional marriage between one man and one woman. >> you are witness to a modern tale of resurrection. a second-coming. the bible speaks of lazarus, raised by jesus from the grave to walk again among the living. ralph reed, too, has been returned to life, political life. but he goes lazarus one further. lazarus was a poor man. reed is rich, and he just keeps getting richer from mixing religion and politics. and that's a story you don't want to miss. at age 33, ralph reed was the christian right's wonder boy. anointed in a 1995 "time" magazine cover story as the "right hand of god" for spinning the trust of conservative christians into political gold. it was reed who built the christian coalition of televangelist pat robertson into a powerful arm of the republican party. >> as religious conservatives we have finally gained what we have always sought. a place at the table, a sense of legitimacy and a voice in the conversation that we call democracy. >> in 2000, reed helped put george w. bush and dick cheney in the white house. >
on these changes to the law before they were introduced in state houses across the country. >> the united states of alec. and -- >>> we had a drum roll of media attention that said if you don't stop and watch the debates that night you're really missing out on an important cultural moment. >> announcer, funding is provided by, carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org." anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman
's back. now it wasn't just a publicity stunt that gave the united states a black eye, just the transaction costs for having to manipulate all the money and stave off the debt ceiling cost, according to the government accountability office, $1.3 billion. >> and why did that impasse occur? why couldn't they solve the deficit crisis? or why wouldn't they solve the deficit crisis? >> because they believed that they had obama over a barrel. and that they could force him to do what they wanted, which was to radically downsize all domestic discretionary spending. and he wasn't going to do it. and that's how we got to that situation. >> what do you think's going to happen after the election, no matter who wins? because the popular expectation is that we're heading toward a fiscal cliff. are we going to go through in those few months between the election and the inauguration, what we went through with the deficit crisis that you just talked about? >> i would say the likeliest possibility is that we'll get some sort of short-term extension of the provisions to kick the can down the r
, in the citizens united era, we're moving dangerously close into a kind of corporate state mentality, where the corporations operate with impunity in the supreme court. and they're now endowed not with personhood rights, as some people think, but super personhood rights. because they have all kinds of protections that ordinary human beings don't have, like limited liability and perpetual life. and they continue to, you know, accrue wealth through the generations. but now they're given political free speech rights that people theoretically have. but of course, most american citizens don't have millions of dollars to spend in politics. but the corporations do. and it's, you know, a matter of chump change for them to put several million dollars into a campaign that could, you know, very much affect the direction of public policy. >> you live in new york, katrina, if you were explaining to another straphanger on a moving subway the impact on that person's life of citizens united, what would you tell her before the next stop? >> what's misunderstood is that money is not an abstraction. money wil
"first national bank of boston vs. bellotti," where he said, "the state need not permit its own creature to coume it." and yet, this court is saying that, "we must permit the creation of the state legislures to consume our politics." and so to me, the citizens united case is the emblem for the whole era we're in. we're living in the "citizens united era," i think. >> but before citizens united, wealthy people were funneling money into politics, corporations were forming political action committees. and ceos of those corporations were lavishing money on selected favored political candidates. >> absolutely right, the corporate voice was never missing. and that's something, y know, justice stevens has pointed out. he said, "there were many faults to american politics. but nobody thought that a lack or a dearth of corporate voices was among the vices." but there was still a radical change effectuated by the majority -- >> how so? radical? >> in citizens united. >> what do you mean? >> because before corporations could have issue ads. they could take out an ad in the "new york times" on somet
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)

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